the bible tells us how taxes work

I just realized this morning that my favorite bible passage explains my position on taxes in America. There seems to always be an argument about whose taxes will go up and whose taxes will go down in any particular economic plan. Sen. Barack Obama has a plan that supposedly provides tax relief to the middle class, while putting more taxes on corporations and the rich. And he passes it off as if that’s okay! Even Obama’s running mate, Sen. Joe Biden, said that the middle class is where it’s at, and that’s where we need to focus our tax cuts.

Folks, this is all crap. You can’t tell me that you’re going to reduce my taxes, and to pay for it you’re going to increase taxes on the rich. You can’t tell me that you’re going to reduce my taxes, and to pay for it you’re going to increase corporate taxes. This idea obviously works for the ignorant, but not for those of us who are wise to the plan. When you tax my neighbor, you tax me. Who do you think the corporations are?

The bible passage I’m referring to is Matthew 25:40:

Whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.

It’s that simple. If you tax my neighbor simply because he’s richer than me, then he’ll have less money keep up his yard. He’ll have less money to contribute to our tax base. He’ll have less money to donate to our neighborhood church. If you tax corporations as if they are some obscure entity out there, you forget that many Americans work for these corporations, and many Americans buy goods and services from these corporations. Tax a corporation more, and that corporation has to pay for it somehow. They’ll cut benefits to their employees. They’ll increase prices on their products and services.

So, if you’re one of those Americans who sits in front of your TV listening to Sen. Barack Obama say, “my plan only increases taxes on people making more than $250,000,” and you pump your fists and say back to the TV, “go get ’em Barack, tax the rich, give me some relief, I’m the one who deserves,” then you’ve got it all wrong.

The next time you go in to work, ask your boss or the owner of the company what they think about a possible increase in corporate taxes.

When you tax my neighbor, you tax me.